Thursday, October 16, 2014

The Absorbent Mind: Chapter 21: Children’s Possessiveness and Its Transformations

“The child is the spiritual builder of mankind, and obstacles to his free development are the stones in the wall by which the soul of man has become imprisoned.” — Maria Montessori, The Absorbent Mind, p. 221.

NAMC Montessori absorbent mind ch 21 possessiveness child with ladybug

When my son was a toddler, he was intrigued by the minutiae of his environment. Ants crawling along the pathway were fascinating to him. Their tiny parade seemed to race from one place to another. As his tiny foot lifted in an attempt to learn what would happen if they were crushed, I gently stopped him, saying, “Ants are living creatures. Let’s watch where they are going instead.” Following their linear progression, we quietly observed them carrying food back to their nest.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Thursday, October 16, 2014.

Tuesday, October 7, 2014

The Absorbent Mind: Chapter 20: Character Building is the Child’s Own Achievement



“Children construct their own characters.” — Maria Montessori, The Absorbent Mind, p. 208.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Tuesday, October 7, 2014.

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

The Absorbent Mind: Chapter 14: Intelligence and the Hand


“Therefore, it is clear that we must not carry the child about, but let him walk, and if his hand wishes to work, we must provide him with things on which he can exercise an intelligent activity.” — Maria Montessori, The Absorbent Mind, p. 155.


As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Wednesday, October 1, 2014.

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Helping Children with Executive Function Challenges in the Montessori Environment


“To let the child do as he likes when he has not yet developed any powers of control, is to betray the idea of freedom.” — Maria Montessori, The Absorbent Mind, p. 205.

Previously, we discussed how to add variety to the Montessori three-period lesson to help children learn to generalize, or transfer information. Behavior interventions will also play a role in developing good judgment and impulse control.


As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Wednesday, September 24, 2014.

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

The Three-Period Lesson and Generalization: Helping Cognitive Processing in the Montessori Environment

NAMC Montessori three period lesson cognitive processing

Along with controlled error and freedom to choose your own work, nothing is quite as Montessori as the three-period lesson. The three-period lesson is a focused and precise way of presenting new vocabulary and concepts to children in a consistent manner, allowing them a sense of comfort and security. They know what to expect every time something new is presented and can focus their entire attention on the concept rather than on the structure of the lesson.

The structure of the three-period lesson is simple. It is made up of three phases:

  • 1. This is… (Naming Phase)
  • 2. Show me… (Recognition, Association Phase)
  • 3. What is…? (Recall, Confirmation of Knowledge Phase)


As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Wednesday, September 17, 2014.

Tuesday, September 9, 2014

Executive Function and Childhood Development


A while back, we presented a blog called What is Executive Function? Montessori Perspectives. In that article, we discussed that executive function involves working memory, inhibitory control, and mental flexibility. Executive function is important for cognitive, social, emotional, and moral development. It helps us understand, internalize, and fulfill the steps required to solve a problem:
  •          Recognize a problem.
  •          Make a plan to solve the problem.
  •          Execute the plan.
  •          Evaluate effectiveness.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Tuesday, September 9, 2014.

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

The Absorbent Mind: Chapter 19: The Child’s Contribution to Society — Normalization

“The transition from one state to the other always follows a piece of work done by the hands with real things, work accompanied by mental concentration.” — Maria Montessori, The Absorbent Mind, p. 204.



As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Wednesday, August 20, 2014.

Tuesday, August 12, 2014

Observing Sensitive Periods in Young Children

“It was the children themselves who showed that they preferred one another’s company to dolls, and the small ‘real life’ utensils to toys.” — Maria Montessori, The Absorbent Mind, p. 169.



As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Tuesday, August 12, 2014.
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As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community.

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