Wednesday, September 17, 2014

The Three-Period Lesson and Generalization: Helping Cognitive Processing in the Montessori Environment

NAMC Montessori three period lesson cognitive processing

Along with controlled error and freedom to choose your own work, nothing is quite as Montessori as the three-period lesson. The three-period lesson is a focused and precise way of presenting new vocabulary and concepts to children in a consistent manner, allowing them a sense of comfort and security. They know what to expect every time something new is presented and can focus their entire attention on the concept rather than on the structure of the lesson.

The structure of the three-period lesson is simple. It is made up of three phases:

  • 1. This is… (Naming Phase)
  • 2. Show me… (Recognition, Association Phase)
  • 3. What is…? (Recall, Confirmation of Knowledge Phase)


As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Wednesday, September 17, 2014.

Tuesday, September 9, 2014

Executive Function and Childhood Development


A while back, we presented a blog called What is Executive Function? Montessori Perspectives. In that article, we discussed that executive function involves working memory, inhibitory control, and mental flexibility. Executive function is important for cognitive, social, emotional, and moral development. It helps us understand, internalize, and fulfill the steps required to solve a problem:
  •          Recognize a problem.
  •          Make a plan to solve the problem.
  •          Execute the plan.
  •          Evaluate effectiveness.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Tuesday, September 9, 2014.

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

The Absorbent Mind: Chapter 19: The Child’s Contribution to Society — Normalization

“The transition from one state to the other always follows a piece of work done by the hands with real things, work accompanied by mental concentration.” — Maria Montessori, The Absorbent Mind, p. 204.



As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Wednesday, August 20, 2014.

Tuesday, August 12, 2014

Observing Sensitive Periods in Young Children

“It was the children themselves who showed that they preferred one another’s company to dolls, and the small ‘real life’ utensils to toys.” — Maria Montessori, The Absorbent Mind, p. 169.



As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Tuesday, August 12, 2014.

Thursday, August 7, 2014

Command Cards for Montessori Elementary Students


There are two main types of shelf work in the Montessori environment. The first is the Montessori materials themselves. The second consists of a series of cards known as command or task cards that provide follow-up work to lessons and activities. Students work with command cards to practice what they have learned. As the name implies, command cards invite the child to do something with what they have learned, showing that they have command of the concept.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Thursday, August 7, 2014.

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

The Absorbent Mind: Chapter 18: Character and Its Defects in Childhood

“It follows that the child’s character develops in accordance with the obstacles he has encountered or the freedom favoring his development that he has enjoyed.” – Maria Montessori, The Absorbent Mind, p. 195. 




As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Tuesday, July 29, 2014.

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Increasing Montessori Enrollments with Online Marketing




As I was driving through my neighborhood this week, I noticed small signs scattered about town that advertised the local Montessori school. All that was written on the signs was the name of the school and the phone number. I don’t think there are many parents who would pull off the road to stop and copy the phone number down. However, these types of signs are meant to call attention rather than give information. If the school is lucky, parents will remember the name and Google it when they get home. If the school has planned well, they will have a strong online presence to satisfy curious parents.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Thursday, July 24, 2014.

Thursday, July 17, 2014

The Absorbent Mind Chapter 17: Further Elaboration: Part 3: The Mathematical Mind

“The results we obtain with our little ones contrast oddly with the fact that mathematics is so often held to be a scourge rather than pleasure in school programs. Most people have developed ‘mental barriers’ against it. Yet all is easy if only its roots can be implanted in the absorbent mind.”Maria Montessori, The Absorbent Mind, p. 186.



As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Thursday, July 17, 2014.
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As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community.

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